Pre-Med to MD Curriculum Plans

2 + 4 Pre-Med to MD Combined Programs
3 + 4 Pre-Med to MD Combined Programs

College of Health Sciences Course Descriptions and Credit Hours

BIOL110 Biology I – Inheritance, Evolution, & Diversity of Life (3 cr)

This course is an introduction to principles of biology that underlie all of the life sciences. Topics include the scientific method, genetic basis of inheritance, theory of evolution, tree of life, phylogenetic classification, comparative physiology, population biology and ecology.

Prerequisites: none

BIOL110L Biology I – Inheritance, Evolution, & Diversity of Life Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concomitantly with BIOL110 lecture course.

Prerequisites: BIOL110 if not taken together

BIOL120 Biology II – Cells & Biomolecules (3 cr)

A continuation of BIOL110 that focuses on cell and molecular biology. Topics include cell organelles, cell physiology, membrane biology, bioenergetics, DNA, RNA, replication, gene transcription and regulation, protein synthesis, and protein structure and function.

Prerequisites: BIOL110 or permission of the instructor

BIOL120L Biology II – Cells & Biomolecules and Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with BIOL120 lecture course.

Prerequisites: BIOL120 if not taken together

BIOL210 Human Anatomy (4 cr)

This course and its integrated laboratory section provides a comprehensive overview of the gross anatomy of the human body. The architecture of the body and its structural relationships are presented with the use of three-dimensional models and software. No dissection is required.

Prerequisites: BIOL120 or permission of the instructor

BIOL220 Human Physiology (3 cr)

The science of human physiology is presented in broad survey. Questions addressed by the course include: How does the body function at a mechanistic level? What are the quantitative principles of homeostasis compatible with life? A systems-based approach is used to examine the detailed function of the major organs and compartments of the body.

Prerequisites: BIOL210 or permission of the instructor

BIOL220L Human Physiology Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion physiology laboratory course offered concurrently with BIOL220 lecture course. Prerequisites: BIOL210 and BIOL220 if not taken together

BIOL310General Microbiology (3 cr)

This course is a general introduction to the study of microscopic forms of life including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, fungi, and algae.

Prerequisites: BIOL120 and BIOL230 or permission of the instructor

BIOL310L General Microbiology Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with BIOL310 lecture course.

Prerequisites: BIOL310 if not taken together

BIOL420 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology (3 cr)

This course covers a variety of advanced topics in cell biology such as mechanisms of signal transduction, bioenergetics, cell cycle regulation, cancer, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and senescence (cellular aging). It also describes the technical basis of modern techniques of molecular biology such as recombinant DNA technology, genome sequencing, bioinformatics, gene therapy, transgenic animals, and cellular imaging.

Prerequisites: BIOL120 and CHEM220 or permission of the instructor

CHEM110 General Chemistry I (3 cr)

This course covers the electronic structure of atoms, periodic table, quantum theory, atomic bonding, molecular orbitals, principles of molecular structure, and chemical reactions. Students are introduced to the diversity of inorganic and organic chemical interactions that underlie the physical substance of matter.

Prerequisites: none

CHEM110L General Chemistry I Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM110 lecture course.

Prerequisites: CHEM110 if not taken together

CHEM120 General Chemistry II (3 cr)

A continuation of CHEM110 that focuses on states and physical properties of matter, thermodynamics, chemical reaction mechanisms, acids and bases, pH, chemical equilibria, and chemical kinetics.

Prerequisites: CHEM110

CHEM120L General Chemistry II Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM120 lecture course. Prerequisites: CHEM120 if not taken together

CHEM210 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr)

This course covers the chemistry of major classes of organic molecules and functional groups such as halogens, amines, ethers, esters, and amides. Organic compounds are broadly defined as molecules that contain carbon, an extremely versatile element in terms of its chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM120 and CHEM120L

CHEM220 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)

A continuation of CHEM210 that expands upon organic reactions, organic synthesis, and biomolecules relevant to biology and medicine.

Prerequisites: CHEM210

CHEM220L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (2 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM220 lecture course.

Prerequisites: CHEM220 if not taken together

CHEM310 Biochemistry (3 cr)

The science of biochemistry is focused on chemistry specific to living organisms. Beginning with a detailed description of the structure of biomolecules and macromolecules such as DNA, amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, major topics of the course include enzyme mechanism and kinetics, metabolic pathways of biosynthesis and catabolism, and physical methods of analysis used in biochemical research.

Prerequisites: CHEM220 and CHEM220L

MATH120 Applied Statistics (3)

Applied statistics is the use of statistical theory and methods in quantitative analysis of numerical data. Starting from elementary laws of probability, the course explains why certain kinds of data conform to specific probability distributions and how statistical tests allow levels of significance to be determined in objective studies and hypothesis testing.

Prerequisites: none

MATH130 Differential and Integral Calculus (3)

Calculus is a powerful mathematical approach used to solve many complex problems that concern rate of change and multi-dimensional objects. It has numerous applications in diverse fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, economics, and business. Many professional schools in health sciences and business require at least one semester of calculus.

Prerequisites: MATH110 or instructor approval based on math placement test

PHYS210 Physics I (3 cr)

Physics describes universal laws of nature that underlie the workings of the universe. The first part of the two-semester course describes the theory and quantitative relationships of motion, force, energy, gravity, light, optics, and sound.

Prerequisites: MATH130 or instructor approval

PHYS210L Physics 1 Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with PHYS210 lecture course.

Prerequisites: PHYS210 if not taken consecutively

PHYS220 Physics II (3 cr)

A continuation of PHYS210 that covers electromagnetism, electronics, solid-state physics, quantum theory, nuclear physics, particle physics, and relativity.

Prerequisites: PHYS210

PHYS220L Physics II Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with PHYS20 lecture course.

Prerequisites: PHYS220 if not taken together

ENGL110 English Composition I (3 cr)

This purpose of this course is to ensure that all students develop the ability to write lucid and logically structured prose that meets accepted standards of business correspondence and professional publications and are able to effectively use word processing software and online writing tools. Diagnostic writing exercises will be used to assess students’ basic skills of English grammar and vocabulary in order to customize instruction to level of skill. Increasingly complex assignments on topics relevant to health science will be used to establish and refine writing competency.

Prerequisites: none

ENGL120 English Composition II (3 cr)

A continuation of ENGL110 that emphasizes originality, definition of and avoidance of plagiarism, proper methods of source citation, and further development of clarity, presentation, and writing style.

Prerequisites: none

COMM110 Oral Communication (3 cr)

This course allows student to learn and practice the art of oral communication in a variety of formats commonly encountered in professional settings: small group discussion and conferences, teaching, presentations accompanied by visual information, and formal speeches. Practice exercises with feedback from the instructor and student peers will help each student to improve delivery and confidence in speaking before groups.

Prerequisites: none

COM501 Foundations of Clinical Medicine (6 cr)

The Foundations of Clinical Medicine Unit will introduce the practice of using clinical presentations (CPs) to frame the delivery of the basic and clinical sciences. The CPs within this first unit will be focused on common situations and presentations that a primary care physician will experience. Each week consists of 1 to 2 clinical presentations that are accompanied by schemes, process worksheets, and objectives lists. Clinical faculty will walk the students through the scheme(s) emphasizing critical decision points and setting the framework for the integration of the basic sciences. Following the scheme presentation by the clinical faculty, basic science faculty will introduce the foundational concepts in each of the traditional basic sciences. For example, during the Well Visits CP students will attend learning modules focused on normal cell structure and growth, mechanisms of immunization, and introduction to pathological processes. The learning module topics associated with each of the clinical presentations are listed below. Additionally, students will participate in worked case example sessions as well as take part in a Medical Skills and Masters Colloquium course that runs concurrently with the systems-based courses.

COM511 Integumentary-Musculoskeletal Systems Course (7 Cr)

This courses contains fourteen clinical presentations that reflect commonly encountered situations affecting the integumentary and musculoskeletal systems. The course is focused on providing students with a detailed understanding of normal structure, function and pathologic dysfunction of the two systems. Each week of the seven weeks consists of 1 to 3 clinical presentations, which are accompanied by clinical algorithms, clinical reasoning guides, and detailed objectives lists. Clinical faculty will lead the students through the clinical algorithms emphasizing critical decision points and setting the framework for the integration of the basic and clinical sciences. Following the clinical algorithms presentation, basic science faculty will present the fundamental principles from the basic sciences (e.g. anatomy, histology, embryology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology) to ensure adequate knowledge and skills required to arrive at a correct diagnosis. This biomedical science experience will highlight the normal structure and functions of the system as a whole, followed by presentations of various disease states including management and treatment options. In addition to the small and large group interactive sessions, library and laboratory resources that support each clinical presentation, students will attend anatomy labs and perform appropriate cadaver dissection and review prosected materials. Plain and contrast X-rays, and CT, US and MRI scans will be presented to illustrate normal and abnormal structures related to disease processes as well as to illustrate clinical applications. In addition, students will participate in clinical case small group sessions and take part in Masters Colloquium and Medical Skills courses that runs concurrently all of which help students integrate basic science contents and their clinical applications.

COM 526 HEMATOLOGY Systems Course (4 Cr)

This unit deals with components of the hematopoietic system – bone marrow, blood, and lymphoid tissues – emphasizing basic structures (of cells, tissues, organs) and functions (from molecular to tissue to whole organ level) in health and disease. Two microscopy sessions and one-in class “laboratory” provide students with the opportunity to practice their skills at blood film and bone marrow cell identification and interpretation. Clinical presentations within the Hematology unit are focused on common situations and presentations that a primary care physician is most likely to experience, such as anemia, polycythemia, abnormal white cells, lymphadenopathy, abnormal bleeding (bleeding diathesis), and hypercoagulable states. Each week consists of 1 to 2 clinical presentations accompanied by schemes, process worksheets, and lists of learning objectives. Clinical faculty will introduce students to the scheme(s) for each clinical presentation, emphasizing critical decision points and setting the framework for integration of the basic and clinical sciences to each topic. Following the scheme presentation, faculty will present fundamental principles from the basic sciences (e.g. anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology, physiology) which underlie understanding of the schematic algorithms and provide knowledge and skills required to arrive at a correct diagnosis. Basic science sessions will highlight normal/homeostatic structure and function, followed by examination of relevant disease states, including introduction to care and treatment options.

COM 551 Neuroscience (9 Cr)

The unit spans nine weeks and contains twenty-one clinical presentations that reflect commonly encountered situations affecting the nervous system. The course is focused on providing students with a detailed understanding of normal structure, function and pathologic dysfunction of the nervous system and special senses. Depending on the week, 1 to 4 clinical presentations will be covered, each one of them accompanied by schemes, process worksheets, and detailed objectives lists. Clinical faculty will lead the students through the schemes emphasizing critical decision points and setting the framework for the integration of the basic and clinical sciences. Following the scheme presentation, basic science faculty will present the fundamental principles from the traditional basic sciences (e.g., anatomy, histology, embryology, biochemistry, immunology, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology) to ensure adequate knowledge and skills required to arrive at a correct diagnosis. These basic science lectures will highlight the normal structures and functions of the nervous system as a whole, including special senses, followed by presentations of various disease states including management and treatment options. In addition to the lectures, library resources, and other learning activities that support each clinical presentation, students will attend anatomy labs and perform appropriate cadaver dissection activities and review prosected materials to reinforce learning of structures and relationships described in lecture. Traditional X-rays, CT scans and MRIs will be presented to illustrate normal and abnormal structures related to disease processes as well to illustrate some management techniques. In addition, students will participate in worked case example sessions with clinical faculty and take part in a Medical Skills course that runs concurrently and supports content covered, emphasizing the skills that the students need to acquire to diagnose and for the management of different clinical cases.

COM 531 Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Systems Course (9 Cr)

The Cardiovascular and Pulmonary (CVP) course: This course deals with components of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary systems, which includes – the heart and major vessels, peripheral vascular system, lungs and its vessels and their integrated functions under normal and abnormal conditions. This course teaches the main components of the CVP system at a molecular, cellular, tissue and organ level, both in health and disease as well as their treatment and prophylactic strategies.

Contact

Phone: 916-686-7657
info.chs@cnsu.edu

Address

California Northstate University
College of Health Sciences
2910 Prospect Park Drive
Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

College Code

SAT College Code: 7669
ACT College Code: 7032