Pre-Pharm to PharmD Curriculum Plans

2 + 4 Pre-Pharm to PharmD Curriculum Plan
3 + 4 Pre-Pharm to PharmD Curriculum Plan

College of Health Sciences Course Descriptions and Credit Hours

BIOL110 Biology I – Inheritance, Evolution, & Diversity of Life (3 cr)

This course is an introduction to principles of biology that underlie all of the life sciences. Topics include the scientific method, genetic basis of inheritance, theory of evolution, tree of life, phylogenetic classification, comparative physiology, population biology and ecology.

Prerequisites: none

BIOL110L Biology I – Inheritance, Evolution, & Diversity of Life Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concomitantly with BIOL110 lecture course. Prerequisites: BIOL110 if not taken together

BIOL120 Biology II – Cells & Biomolecules (3 cr)

A continuation of BIOL110 that focuses on cell and molecular biology. Topics include cell organelles, cell physiology, membrane biology, bioenergetics, DNA, RNA, replication, gene transcription and regulation, protein synthesis, and protein structure and function.

Prerequisites: BIOL110 or permission of the instructor

BIOL120L Biology II – Cells & Biomolecules and Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with BIOL120 lecture course. Prerequisites: BIOL120 if not taken together

BIOL210 Human Anatomy (4 cr)

This course and its integrated laboratory section provides a comprehensive overview of the gross anatomy of the human body. The architecture of the body and its structural relationships are presented with the use of three-dimensional models and software. No dissection is required.

Prerequisites: BIOL120 or permission of the instructor

BIOL220 Human Physiology (3 cr)

The science of human physiology is presented in broad survey. Questions addressed by the course include: How does the body function at a mechanistic level? What are the quantitative principles of homeostasis compatible with life? A systems-based approach is used to examine the detailed function of the major organs and compartments of the body. Prerequisites: BIOL210 or permission of the instructor

BIOL220L Human Physiology Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion physiology laboratory course offered concurrently with BIOL220 lecture course.

Prerequisites: BIOL210 and BIOL220 if not taken together

BIOL310General Microbiology (3 cr)

This course is a general introduction to the study of microscopic forms of life including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, fungi, and algae.

Prerequisites: BIOL120 and BIOL230 or permission of the instructor

BIOL310L General Microbiology Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with BIOL310 lecture course.

Prerequisites: BIOL310 if not taken together

BIOL420 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology (3 cr)

This course covers a variety of advanced topics in cell biology such as mechanisms of signal transduction, bioenergetics, cell cycle regulation, cancer, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and senescence (cellular aging). It also describes the technical basis of modern techniques of molecular biology such as recombinant DNA technology, genome sequencing, bioinformatics, gene therapy, transgenic animals, and cellular imaging.

Prerequisites: BIOL120 and CHEM220 or permission of the instructor

CHEM110 General Chemistry I (3 cr)

This course covers the electronic structure of atoms, periodic table, quantum theory, atomic bonding, molecular orbitals, principles of molecular structure, and chemical reactions. Students are introduced to the diversity of inorganic and organic chemical interactions that underlie the physical substance of matter.

Prerequisites: none

CHEM110L General Chemistry I Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM110 lecture course.

Prerequisites: CHEM110 if not taken together

CHEM120 General Chemistry II (3 cr)

A continuation of CHEM110 that focuses on states and physical properties of matter, thermodynamics, chemical reaction mechanisms, acids and bases, pH, chemical equilibria, and chemical kinetics.

Prerequisites: CHEM110

CHEM120L General Chemistry II Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM120 lecture course.

Prerequisites: CHEM120 if not taken together

CHEM210 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr)

This course covers the chemistry of major classes of organic molecules and functional groups such as halogens, amines, ethers, esters, and amides. Organic compounds are broadly defined as molecules that contain carbon, an extremely versatile element in terms of its chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM120 and CHEM120L

CHEM220 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr)

A continuation of CHEM210 that expands upon organic reactions, organic synthesis, and biomolecules relevant to biology and medicine.

Prerequisites: CHEM210

CHEM220L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (2 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CHEM220 lecture course.

Prerequisites: CHEM220 if not taken together

CHEM310 Biochemistry (3 cr)

The science of biochemistry is focused on chemistry specific to living organisms. Beginning with a detailed description of the structure of biomolecules and macromolecules such as DNA, amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, major topics of the course include enzyme mechanism and kinetics, metabolic pathways of biosynthesis and catabolism, and physical methods of analysis used in biochemical research.

Prerequisites: CHEM220 and CHEM220L

MATH120 Applied Statistics (3)

Applied statistics is the use of statistical theory and methods in quantitative analysis of numerical data. Starting from elementary laws of probability, the course explains why certain kinds of data conform to specific probability distributions and how statistical tests allow levels of significance to be determined in objective studies and hypothesis testing.

Prerequisites: none

MATH130 Differential and Integral Calculus (3)

Calculus is a powerful mathematical approach used to solve many complex problems that concern rate of change and multi-dimensional objects. It has numerous applications in diverse fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, economics, and business. Many professional schools in health sciences and business require at least one semester of calculus.

Prerequisites: MATH110 or instructor approval based on math placement test

PHYS210 Physics I (3 cr)

Physics describes universal laws of nature that underlie the workings of the universe. The first part of the two-semester course describes the theory and quantitative relationships of motion, force, energy, gravity, light, optics, and sound.

Prerequisites: MATH130 or instructor approval

PHYS210L Physics 1 Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with PHYS210 lecture course.

Prerequisites: PHYS210 if not taken consecutively

PHYS220 Physics II (3 cr)

A continuation of PHYS210 that covers electromagnetism, electronics, solid-state physics, quantum theory, nuclear physics, particle physics, and relativity.

Prerequisites: PHYS210

PHYS220L Physics II Laboratory (1 cr)

Companion laboratory course to be taken concurrently with PHYS20 lecture course.

Prerequisites: PHYS220 if not taken together

ENGL110 English Composition I (3 cr)

This purpose of this course is to ensure that all students develop the ability to write lucid and logically structured prose that meets accepted standards of business correspondence and professional publications and are able to effectively use word processing software and online writing tools. Diagnostic writing exercises will be used to assess students’ basic skills of English grammar and vocabulary in order to customize instruction to level of skill. Increasingly complex assignments on topics relevant to health science will be used to establish and refine writing competency.

Prerequisites: none

ENGL120 English Composition II (3 cr)

A continuation of ENGL110 that emphasizes originality, definition of and avoidance of plagiarism, proper methods of source citation, and further development of clarity, presentation, and writing style. Prerequisites: none

COMM110 Oral Communication (3 cr)

This course allows student to learn and practice the art of oral communication in a variety of formats commonly encountered in professional settings: small group discussion and conferences, teaching, presentations accompanied by visual information, and formal speeches. Practice exercises with feedback from the instructor and student peers will help each student to improve delivery and confidence in speaking before groups.

Prerequisites: none

1. Biomedical Sciences

PHAR 621: Cellular and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (5 cr)

The Cellular and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry course is designed to provide the pharmacy students with a fundamental understanding of current concepts of cellular and molecular biology, and human biochemistry. Students are provided an overview of eukaryotic carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism, cellular signal transduction, biomedical aspects of human nutrition, genetic regulation, the molecular basis of inherited genetic diseases and acquired diseases like cancer, principles of commonly used biotechnologies, drug targets screening, and biopharmaceutical products generation.

Prerequisites Courses: None

PHAR 622: Pathophysiology and Pharmacology I: Neurological/Neuro-Endocrine/Psych (6 cr0

In this course, students will learn to identify drug targets based upon an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of major neurological, neuroendocrine and psychological diseases. They will learn to recognize the symptoms of neurological, neuroendocrine & psychological disorders, which will improve their ability to make pharmaceutical recommendations to patients. Students will learn the mechanism of action and adverse effects of pharmacological classes of drugs used to treat major neurological, neuroendocrine and psychological diseases. They will utilize this knowledge & their ability to recognize potential adverse effects of drugs to identify and select appropriate alternative pharmacological agents for patients who exhibit significant adverse effects to existing pharmacological therapy.

Prerequisites Courses: PHAR 621, 631

PHAR 724: Pathophysiology and Pharmacology II: Cardiovascular, Diabetes, Thyroid (6 cr)

This course describes and evaluates underlying pathogenesis of major cardiovascular disorders and the cardiovascular pharmacology. Upon completion of this course, students gain an understanding of major cardiovascular disease states, drug targets based on understanding the pathophysiology, the mechanism of action and adverse effects of drugs used to treat cardiovascular disorders. Selected topics include hypertension, dyslipidemia, thrombosis, arrhythmia, ischemic heart diseases, heart failure, venous thromboembolism, peripheral arterial diseases, valvular disease and cardiovascular shocks. In addition, this course describes the pathophysiology of two of the endocrine glands, thyroid and pancreas. Students gain an understanding of underlying pathogenesis of hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and Diabetes Mellitus, and mechanism of action and adverse effects of pharmacological classes and agents to treat these endocrine disorders.

Prerequisites Courses: PHAR 621, 631, 633, 622

PHAR 725: Pathophysiology and Pharmacology III: Pulmonary/ Renal/ GI/GU (5cr)

This course will cover the functional anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the reproductive endocrine systems, adrenal cortex, regulation of calcium, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. This course will also describe the disorders of these systems and the pharmacology of the medications used to treat these disorders.

Prerequisite Courses: 621, 622, 623, 641, 642, 724

PHAR 827: Immunology and Rheumatology (4 cr)

The course will focus on cellular immunology integrating pathophysiology and pharmacological mechanisms with the pharmacotherapeutic interventions used in the management of allergy, anaphylaxis, cancer, autoimmune disease, vaccination for disease, AIDS, etc. Students are provided with an overview of immunity, cells and proteins of the immune system, along with their specific roles and interactions in human immunity and disease. Students will gain understanding of disease state management through the interpretation of case reports, laboratory findings, application of pharmacologic principles and evidence based guidelines. These principles will be emphasized in reading assignments, assigned applications, and in class discussion. Relevant updates in clinical research and practice recommendations will also be discussed. Team based and evidence based patient case discussion and patient pharmacotherapeutical treatment plan recitation will be applied throughout the course.

Prerequisite Courses: 621,631, 622, 724, 725.

2. Pharmaceutical Sciences

PHAR 631: Medicinal Chemistry & Physical Pharmacy (5 cr)

The course consists of four components: 1) Fundamentals of Medicinal Chemistry – which introduces the concepts required to understand the principles of Medicinal Chemistry, including drug structure-relationships, prediction of the physico-chemical properties of a drug, basic knowledge of the major pathways of drug metabolism and factors that can contribute to drug-drug interactions. 2) The students will be able to predict the solubility, metabolism and pharmacological activity/potency of drugs classes based on the contribution of their functional groups to their structures. 3)The course is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of drug assay and the application of chemical and physico-chemical methods of analysis to pharmaceutical substances.4)The course provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the active constituents of natural medicines with emphasis on the top selling medicinal herbs.

Prerequisite Courses: None

PHAR 632: Biopharmaceutics, Drug Delivery and Calculations (5 cr)

This course is designed to give students an appreciation of the formulation, manufacture, and testing of dosage forms as well as an understanding of the interactions between complex drug delivery systems and biological systems. The course covers all the basic dosage forms and drug delivery systems as well as the routes of administration, absorption, and bioavailability. The course will also cover pharmaceutical calculations and gives an overview of drug quality control and regulation.

Prerequisite Courses: None

PHAR 633: Pharmacokinetics (5 cr)

This course focuses on understanding and applying pharmacokinetic principles for optimizing drug dosage. It is divided in to three modules; descriptive, quantitative, and clinical pharmacokinetics. Descriptive pharmacokinetics provides a basic introduction to the key pharmacokinetic principles. This module enables the student to conceptualize principles such as drug bioavailability, distribution, clearance, and excretion. Concepts of drug absorption, metabolism, protein binding, and pharmacokinetic drug interactions will be discussed as well. Quantitative pharmacokinetics covers the mathematical aspects, including the calculation of pharmacokinetic parameters following drug administration and compartment modeling. The third module, clinical pharmacokinetics, covers the process of using pharmacokinetic principles to optimize individual drug therapy in individuals and in patients with altered physiology.

Prerequisite Courses: PHAR 632

3. Social/Behavioral/Administrative Sciences

PHAR 634: Biostatistics and Pharmacoepidemiology (3 cr)

Understanding and applying the basic principles of biostatistics and pharmacoepidemiology will be emphasized throughout the course. The section on pharmacoepidemiology will focus on methods for discovering, reporting and appraising adverse drug events. The biostatistics section is designed to prepare the student to understand and critically assess statistical output reported in the medical literature.

Prerequisite Courses: None

PHAR 712: Communications (2 cr)

The course is designed to teach student pharmacists the skills and techniques necessary to have productive communication encounters with patients and healthcare professionals using verbal and non-verbal abilities. Utilizing techniques that evolve around oral and written communication, the students will begin to develop the skills necessary to conduct effective patient interviewing/counseling encounters, initiate problem solving & conflict management techniques, and expand their awareness regarding cultural competence and health literacy.

Prerequisites Course: None

PHAR 811: Pharmacy and the Health Care System (3 cr)

This course will introduce the major healthcare stakeholder groups (patients, providers, payers, and policymakers), and elucidate the manner by which their interests and interactions over the last 100 years have shaped the current US healthcare financing and delivery system. Students will learn how to use this information as a framework to identify existing and future healthcare needs, and develop potential pharmacist-driven solutions and implementation strategies.

Prerequisites Course: PHAR 634, 661, 712, 743

PHAR 813: Pharmacy Law and Ethics (3 cr0

This course is designed to teach future pharmacists critical thinking and problem solving skills and techniques necessary to identify, analyze, and evaluate legal and ethical issues for application to the various circumstances that present in pharmacy practice.

Prerequisite Courses: PHAR 611

PHAR 815: Pharmacy Management and Economic Principles (3 cr)

The objective of this course is to provide an opportunity to the pharmacy students to learn important management, organizational, accounting, entrepreneurial, and marketing skills that are useful for pharmacy practice. To provide optimum care and services as a healthcare professional, pharmacists should understand the basic principles of managerial, organizational, and financial management. On a day-to-day basis pharmacists have to deal with people, change, structural demands, and organizational behavior. Therefore, more emphasis will be given to planning, organization, motivation, control, and marketing as they relate to community and health-system pharmacy management. This course will also provide a basic introduction of pharmacoeconomic principles and its application to improve patient outcomes. Course material will provide the students with an understanding of the methods to choose a cost-effective drug therapy for patient populations in order to achieve quality clinical, economic and humanistic outcomes. A combination of classroom mini-lectures, class discussion, required readings, and in-class learning assignments will be used to facilitate the student's understanding of important concepts related to pharmacy management and pharmacoeconomics

Prerequisite Courses: PHAR 811

4. Clinical Sciences

PHAR 641: Self Care I (4 cr)

Self-Care I is the first clinical course that exposes the student to the appropriateness of patient interviewing, physical assessment and product selection of over-the-counter (OTC) medications. This course is interactive and designed to introduce a systematic approach for evaluating a patient’s self care needs. Students will be expected to understand how and why obtaining a comprehensive patient history and potentially conducting a physical exam are necessary to objectively recommend appropriate over-the-counter medications that are safe and effective. Students will begin to appreciate the role of a pharmacist and how educating and empowering patients is a cornerstone in community pharmacy practice.

Prerequisite Courses: None

PHAR 642: SELF CARE II (3 cr)

Self-Care II is the second integrated clinical course that exposes the student to the appropriateness of patient interviewing, physical assessment and product selection of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and complementary alternative medication (CAM) therapy. This course is interactive and designed to continue the systematic approach for evaluating a patient’s self care needs. Students will continue utilizing their skills to take a comprehensive patient history and conduct a proper physical exam, if necessary, for appropriately recommending over-the-counter medications that are safe and effective.

Prerequisite Courses: PHAR 641

PHAR 743: Drug Literature Evaluation & Drug Information (3 cr0

This course will provide a systematic approach to drug information and literature evaluation to optimize patient outcomes. This includes effective searching, retrieval, evaluation and dissemination of electronic and print resources. Students will utilize skills learned in this course to effectively communicate and tailor drug information at the appropriate level for providers, other health professionals, caregivers, patients and the public. In addition students will achieve an understanding of academic publishing and the lifecycle of scientific information. This course will expose students to the principles of study design, data collection and evaluation. Students will be required to do independent evaluations of primary literature and submit written and verbal evaluations of their reviews and work collaboratively as a member of a drug information team.

Prerequisite Courses: None

5. Integrated Sciences

PHAR 757: Pharmacotherapy I: Clinical Foundations & Clinical Neuroscience (Neurologic, Neuroendocrinologic, and Psychiatric Disorders) (8 cr)

The course will focus on clinical foundations and integration of the pathophysiological and pharmacological mechanisms and the pharmacotherapeutic interventions used in the management of disorders that are specific to or have a high prevalence in neurology, neuroendocrinology, and psychiatry.

Prerequisite Courses: 622, 634, 633, 642

PHAR 752: Pharmacotherapy II: CV/Diabetes/Pulm (8 cr)

This course focuses on the development of highly skilled clinical pharmacists. Students are taught to integrate knowledge of therapeutic interventions with the pathophysiological and pharmacological mechanisms and patient specific data to optimally management cardiovascular, pulmonary, and endocrine disorders. Students will gain understanding of disease state management through the interpretation of case reports, laboratory findings, application of pharmacologic principles and evidence based guidelines. These principles will be emphasized in reading assignments, through individual and team in-class applications, and classroom discussion utilizing the Team-Based Learning pedagogy. This learning pedagogy will be supplemented by additional active learning utilizing tools including the Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCE), Journal Club, Simulation, SOAP Notes and Care Plans. Updates in the primary literature and practice recommendations will also be examined. Students will learn to demonstrate clinical skills relevant to providing patient care in simulated learning activities. Evidence based patient case discussion and patient therapeutic treatment plan recitation will be applied throughout the course.

Prerequisite Courses: 724, 633, 757

PHAR 853: Pharmacotherapy III: Renal/GI/Hem/Oncology (8 cr)

This course has four distinct blocks of pharmacotherapy: renal, gastrointestinal, hematologic, and oncologic. For each block the student will need to integrate physiologic, pathophysiologic, pharmacologic, pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, laboratory monitoring, and pharmcotherapeutic principles to assess and/or formulate disease specific pharmacotherapy care plans. The course will focus on optimizing drug therapy through the design, recommendation, implementation, monitoring, and modification of individualized pharmacotherapeutic plans using updated pharmacologic principles, clinical recommendations, and evidence based guidelines. The topics covered include but are not limited to the following: acute and chronic renal diseases, liver disease, cirrhosis and portal hypertension, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer disease, GERD, thromboembolism, hematopoiesis and anemias, updates on cancer biology, clinical pharmacology of chemotherapy and target therapy, symptom management and supportive care for cancer patients, pathophysiology, pharmacotherapy and management of specific major malignancies, such as breast, colorectal, prostate, lung, lymphomas, leukemia and skin cancers.

Prerequisite Courses: 622, 623, 725, 724, 725, 734, 752, 757

PHAR 856: Pharmacotherapy IV: Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (8 cr)

This course will cover the pathophysiology and treatment of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections, as well as the principles of antimicrobial regimen selection and antimicrobial prophylaxis. At the end of this course the student should be able to: identify likely pathogens responsible for a particular infectious disease process; select the appropriate antibiotic(s) to provide antimicrobial coverage for these possible pathogens; select alternative antibiotics should they become necessary; and identify appropriate actions to monitor for efficacy and toxicity. To accomplish these goals, the student will be required to comprehend common microbiologic laboratory tests used to identify microorganisms. The student will be expected to know the mechanisms of action, antimicrobial spectrum, mechanisms of bacterial resistance, common adverse reactions, pharmacokinetics, and appropriate dosing of the various antibiotics discussed during classroom sessions. Additional topics related to men’s and women’s health will also be covered in this course. At the end of those respective sessions, students should be able to select appropriate treatment of patients with erectile dysfunction, benign prostatic hyperplasia, urinary incontinence, and hormonal imbalances specific to each gender. Students should also be able to identify medications that are considered safe or unsafe during pregnancy and/or lactation.

Prerequisite Courses: 631,633, 743, 827

Contact

Phone: 916-686-7657
info.chs@cnsu.edu

Address

California Northstate University
College of Health Sciences
2910 Prospect Park Drive
Rancho Cordova, CA 95670

College Code

SAT College Code: 7669
ACT College Code: 7032